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Tag Archives: 60’s

I’d never heard of Josh White until I bought this album. This only snuck into my collection because the cover jumped out at me and, at a single dollar, I couldn’t resist.  After reading the gatefold I feel that painting did a terrific job at capturing the man’s prodigious swagger.

Josh always had a great style, as a man and as a performer. He had a kind of imperiousness that used to make audiences shut up and listen. God, how he could stare an audience down! He was there to sing, and if people at the tables were talking, he’d hold a post, cigarette behind the ear, foot on the chair, guitar at the ready, and wait until his silence reached out like a living force and whammied the people to attention. Then he’d begin. He was a black man making his way in a white man’s world, he knew he had something everybody out to hear, and he was to be heard, on his own terms.

-Lee Hays & Don McClean

I’m going to do something I don’t know normally do and compose this post almost entirely of Wikipedia excerpts. Now, don’t click away just yet. This man’s story is immensely interesting and a true portrait of the (mostly losing) struggle for free speech in America. In these excerpts you’ll find Josh leading blind guitarists across the U.S. as a barefoot child, portraying Blind Lemon in the story of John Henry on Broadway, serenading the Roosevelts at the White House, and ultimately being blacklisted during the Red Scare.

Of course, in true blues fashion, the story ends with Josh White broken down, both in career and health, and in the grave before his time. He lived a hard life, made beautiful music, and is up there with Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, or any other musician who’s had his life turned into a feature-length film.

So, get comfortable, sit back, and breeze through the beautifully tragic life of Josh White and his sad, sad guitar.

Sorry, no song previews as of yet. Posting previews is getting more and more of a bitch because of electronic copy”right” protection.

Joshua Daniel White (February 11, 1914 – September 5, 1969), better known as Josh White, was an American singer, guitarist, songwriter, actor, and civil rights activist. He also recorded under the names “Pinewood Tom” and “Tippy Barton” in the 1930s.

White also became the closest African-American friend and confidant to president Franklin D. Roosevelt. However, White’s anti-segregationist and international human rights political stance presented in many of his recordings and in his speeches at rallies resulted in the right-wing McCarthyites assuming him a Communist. Accordingly, from 1947 through the mid 1960s, White became caught up in the anti-Communist Red Scare, and combined with the resulting attempt to clear his name, his career was damaged. White’s playing style influenced many future generations of guitarists, including Blind Boy Fuller, Brownie McGhee, Pete Seeger, Lena Horne, Nat King Cole, Harry Belafonte, Lonnie Donegan, Eartha Kitt, Alexis Korner, Odetta, Elvis Presley, The Kingston Trio, the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem, Merle Travis, Dave Van Ronk, Peter, Paul and Mary, Bob Dylan, Eric Weissberg, Judy Collins, Mike Bloomfield, Danny Kalb, Roger McGuinn, David Crosby, Richie Havens, Don McLean, Roy Harper, Ry Cooder, John Fogerty, Eva Cassidy and Jack White.

Two months after his father’s death, Joshua left home with a blind, black street singer named Blind Man Arnold, who he had agreed to lead across the South to collect coins after performances. Arnold would then send White’s mother two dollars a week. Arnold soon realized that he could profit from this gifted boy who quickly learned to dance, sing, and play the tambourine. Over the next eight years, he rented the boy’s services out to 66 different blind street singers, including Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Blake, and Blind Joe Taggart, and in time young Joshua quickly mastered the varied guitar stylings all his blind masters. In order to appear sympathetic to the onlookers tossing coins, the old men kept Joshua shoeless and in ragged short pants till he was sixteen years old. At night he would have to sleep in the cotton fields or in the horse stables, often on an empty stomach, while his master slept in a black hotel.

In February of 1936, he punched his left hand through a glass door during a bar fight, and the hand became infected with gangrene. White was advised by doctors to amputate the hand, and White repeatedly refused. Amputation was averted, but his chording hand was left immobile. Afterwords, he retreated from his recording career to become a dock worker, an elevator operator, and a building superintendent. During the time when his hand was lame, he squeezed a small rubber ball to try and revive it.

One night during a card game, White’s left hand was revived completely; and he immediately began practicing his guitar, and soon put together a group called “Josh White & His Carolinians” with his brother Billy and close friends Carrington Lewis, Sam Gary, and Bayard Rustin. They soon began playing private parties in Harlem. At one of these parties, on New Year’s Eve 1938, Leonard DePaur, a Broadway choral director, was intrigued by Josh’s singing. For the past six months, DePaur and the producers of the Broadway musical in development, John Henry, had been searching America for an actor/singer/guitarist to play the lead role of Blind Lemon, a street minstrel who would wander back and forth across the stage narrating the story in song. Their initial auditions with native New York singers proved to be unsuccessful, so they looked through previous race record releases to find a suitable artist. They eventually narrowed their search down to two people, “Pinewood Tom” and “The Singing Christian”, both used as pseudonyms by White.

After months of rehearsals and out-of-town productions in Philadelphia and Boston, John Henry opened on Broadway on January 10, 1940, with Paul Robeson as John Henry and Joshua White as Blind Lemon. Although the musical did not have long run, it helped jumpstart his career. Soon thereafter, Josh began working with Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly, Burl Ives, and The Golden Gate Quartet in a CBS radio series Back Where I Come From, written by folk song collector Alan Lomax and directed by Nicholas Ray.

Josh and Libby frequently requested the War Department to send them overseas during World War II to give USO concert performances for the troops. However, despite a Letter of Recommendation from Eleanor Roosevelt, they were constantly rejected as “too controversial”, considering that the U.S. Armed Forces were still segregated throughout World War II.

Throughout the 1940s, as a major matinée idol with magnetic sexual charisma and a commanding stage presence, White not only was an international star of recordings, concerts, nightclubs, radio, film, and Broadway, he also achieved a unique position for an African-American of the segregated era by becoming accepted and befriended by white society, aristocracy, European royalty, and America’s ruling family, The Roosevelts.

In January 1941, Josh performed at the President’s Inauguration. Upon completing that first White House Command Performance, the Roosevelts invited White up to their private chambers, where they spent more than three hours talking about Josh’s life story of growing up in Jim Crow South, listening to his songs written about those experiences, and drinking Café Royale (coffee and brandy).

At one point during that evening, the President said to Josh, “You know Josh, when I first heard your song `Uncle Sam Says,’ I thought you were referring to me as Uncle Sam….Am I right?” White responded, “Yes Mr. President, I wrote that song to you after seeing how my brother was treated in the segregated section of Fort Dix army camp. . . However that wasn’t the first song I wrote to you. . . In 1933, I wrote and recorded a song called `Low Cotton,’ about the plight of Negro cotton pickers down South, and in the lyrics I made an appeal directly to you to help their situation.”

The President, interested and impressed at the candor of his response, then asked Josh to sing those songs to him again. A friendship developed, five more Command Performances would follow, in addition to two appearances at the Inaugurations of 1941 and 1945; and the Josh White family would spend many Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays with the Roosevelts at their Hyde Park, New York mansion .

Josh White had reached the zenith of his career when touring with Eleanor Roosevelt on a celebrated and triumphant Goodwill tour of Europe. He had been hosted by the continent’s prime ministers and royal families, and had just performed before 50,000 cheering fans at Stockholm’s soccer stadium. Amidst this tour, while in Paris in June, 1950, White received a call from Mary Chase, his manager in New York, telling him that Red Channels (who had been sending newsletters to the media since 1947 about White and other artists who they warned as being subversive), had just released and distributed a thick magazine with subversive details regarding 151 artists from the entertainment and media industries who they labeled as Communist Sympathizers. White’s name was prominent on this list. There never had been an official blacklist—until now. White immediately went to discuss the situation with Mrs. Roosevelt—to ask her advice and help. With great empathy, she told him that her voice on his behalf would hinder his efforts to clear his name. She explained that if she wasn’t the widow of the president they would also be crucifying her. She continued that the Right Wing press had been calling her a “pinko”, citing her social activism and friendships with non-whites. That night, White called his manager back and alerted her that he would be flying back to America the next day so that he could clear his name. Upon arriving at New York’s Idlewild Airport, the FBI met him, took him into a Customs holding room, began interrogating him, and held him for hours while waiting word from Washington as to whether Josh White, who was born in America, would be deported back to Europe.

In 1961, White’s health began a sharp decline as he experienced the first of the three heart attacks and the progressive heart disease that would plague him over his final eight years. As a lifelong smoker he also had progressive emphysema, in addition to ulcers, and severe psoriasis in his hands and calcium deficiency in his body that would cause the skin to peel off of his fingers and leave his fingernails broken and bleeding with every concert. During the last two years of his life, as his heart weakened dramatically, his wife Carol would put him in the hospital for four weeks after he completed each two-week concert tour. Finally, the doctors felt his only survival option was to attempt a new procedure to replace heart valves. The surgery failed.

He died on the operating table on September 6, 1969 at the North Shore Hospital in Manhasset, New York.

-Wikipedia

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>>>Click here to download Disc 1

>>>Click here to download Disc 2

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Tracklist

A1. Free and Equal Blues

A2. Where Were You, Baby

A3. You Don’t Know My Mind

A4. Sam Hall

A5. Run, Mona, Run

A6. Timber

A7. Takin’ Names

A8. St. James Infirmary

B1. One Meat Ball

B2. Peter

B3. Jelly, Jelly

B4. Jesus Gonna Make Up My Dyin’ Bed

B5.  Halleleu

B6. Prison Bound Blues

C1. Midnight Special

C2. Told My Captain

C3. Going Home, Boys

C4. Trouble

C5. Silicosis Blues

C6. Southern Exposure

C7. Empty Bed Blues

D1. The Story of John Henry

*Download  unavailable. YouTube embedding on WordPress disabled by copyright owners. Pick up a copy of this if you can get it for less than $12.

I picked this up a few weeks ago on Record Store Day at the very choice Explorist International, which is  a few blocks from my residence. Several other records made their way into my collection that day but this one is particularly fun. It caught my ear during a visit a few weeks earlier when the shopkeeper was playing it on the store’s soundsystem, and I wanted to buy it at that time. However, I was unemployed and couldn’t justify paying $17 for what I thought was the soundtrack to a French remake of the American Bonnie and Clyde film when I was worried that buying anything other than Safeway discount yogurt was a vulgar extravagance.

Luckily, a steady typing assignment came my way and now I’m hell bent on blowing my paychecks as soon as possible on LPs, EPs, BPs, 3CPOs, and a few rough DPs. This big daddy here is just a lot of fun. It’s goofy, it’s sexy, it’s corny, and above all it’s terribly catchy.

There’s no French version of the Bonnie & Clyde movie, this is just a song about the famously devious couple. In French. And while it doesn’t make much sense it really does work and twerk.

Here are three examples that display the clever little gimmicks which somehow pop completely and absolutely in every song on this album.


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Tracklist

A1 Brigitte Bardot et Serge Gainsbourg – Bonnie And Clyde

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Michel Colombier Et Son Orchestre
Written-By – Serge Gainsbourg

A2 Brigitte Bardot – Bubble Gum

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Alain Goraguer Et Son Orchestre
Written-By – Serge Gainsbourg

A3 Serge Gainsbourg – Comic Strip

Arranged By, Directed By – David Whitaker
Written-By – Serge Gainsbourg

A4 Brigitte Bardot – Un Jour Comme Un Autre

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Alain Goraguer Et Son Orchestre
Written-By – G. Bourgeois*, J.-M. Rivière*

A5 Serge Gainsbourg – Pauvre Lola

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Alain Goraguer Et Son Orchestre
Written-By – Serge Gainsbourg

A6 Serge Gainsbourg – Du Film “L’eau À La Bouche”

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Alain Goraguer Et Son Orchestre
Written-By – Alain Goraguer, Serge Gainsbourg

B1 Serge Gainsbourg – La Javanaise

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Harry Robinson Et Son Orchestre*
Written-By – Serge Gainsbourg

B2 Brigitte Bardot – La Madrague

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Claude Bolling Et Son Orchestre
Written-By – G. Bourgeois*, J.-M. Rivière*

B3 Serge Gainsbourg – Intoxicated Man

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Alain Goraguer Et Son Orchestre

Written-By – Serge Gainsbourg

B4 Brigitte Bardot – Everybody Loves My Baby

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Claude Bolling Et Son Orchestre
Written-By – Jack Palmer, Spencer Williams (2)

B5 Serge Gainsbourg – Baudelaire

Arranged By, Conductor [Orchestra] – Alain Goraguer Et Son Orchestre
Written-By – Serge Gainsbourg
Lyrics By [Sur Un Poème De] – Ch. Baudelaire*

B6 Serge Gainsbourg – Docteur Jekyll And Mister Hyde

Directed By – Arthur Greenslade
Written-By – Serge Gainsbourg

The awesome album cover copy on the Environments discs never ceases to amaze me. It’s always unintentionally serious and hilarious at the same time. You can check out another one posted on Rebuilt Tranny here and here.

The following copy is from the back of the album cover for volume three.

Side 1

Be-In (A Psychoacoustic Experience)

Sheep Meadow, Central Park, New York City

April 6, 1969

34 minutes, 17 seconds

Before the terrible fire. Details below.

The 1969 Easter Be-In in New York’s Central Park has come to be regarded as a sort of high-water mark for the new almost vanished Love Generation.

The tremendously diverse crowd kept growing and gathering momentum until almost everyone marveled at this spontaneous “thing” that had taken place in the park.

This Be-In was certainly not the biggest gathering of young people to take place in 1969. However, there are many things that happened during this recording that make it a rare, magical moment.

The recording captures with honesty and total realism this particular instant in time which in retrospect seems more than a bit unreal.

Be-In  is the real experience of running barefoot in the grass on a beautiful spring day, surrounded by thousands of half-innocents exhibiting little, if any, trace of paranoia or guilt.

If you were ever at a massive, totally spontaneous gathering in 1969, we think you know the feeling we mean.

This particular disc is unlike anything you’ve heard before; we call it a “psychoacoustic” experience”. It recreates an event with such realism that it actually seems to be happening again. We think that once you experience the total immersion of this encounter, you’ll agree with us that Be-In is something special.

The following video is an example of a rare, magical moment at Central Park in 1969.

Side Two

Dusk at New Hope, Pennsylvania

August, 1970

36 minutes, 51 seconds

Imagine a warm summer night deep in the verdant backwoods in Eastern Pennsylvania.

An infinity of sound stretching out before you. The steady, yet constantly changing drone of countless tiny insects, reminding you of the serenity and timelessness of nature. For in the distance, a hound occasionally barks.

You feel as if you are a thousand miles from the annoyances of city life.

If you can imagine such a night, you pretty much know what our recording of Dusk at New Hope is like.

This highly realistic stereo sound took almost a year of location work and patient testing to perfect. In its present form, it is a perfect compliment [sic] to other natural sound recordings in this series.

In an urban setting, we think you’ll be amazed by the profound changes that take place when you play the disc as a background sound. Many people find that the sounds of night in the country are second to none in creating a setting for increased interpersonal relationships.

Dusk at New Hope can be left on for very long periods of time without inducing fatigue or boredom. Once you become familiar with the sound, we are certain that you will find many new uses for the effect.

How do you make more crickets?

Bonus copy excerpts from the album gatefold.

Be-In

Later in the day, there would be rock throwing and confrontations with the small contingent of policemen nearby, and a terrible moment when a nude dancer leaped into a roaring bonfire, but for this moment in time, frozen on a real of magnetic tape, everyone seems together and happy.

Dusk at New Hope

A little known fact about field crickets is that it is possible to determine the ambient temperature of their surroundings to a fairly accurate degree by simply counting the number of chirps in a fifteen-second period and adding forty. Thus, we have deduced that the temperature at the time of the recording was approximately 65 degrees Fahrenheit. This formula works quite well for field crickets between the temperature range of 55 degrees and 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Above and below these temperatures the cricket no longer sings.

>>>Click here to download Environments Vol. 3 at 320kbps

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If you’re a proud American that loves Civil War-based western movies, written and directed by Italians, that are filmed in Spain you MUST download this soundtrack.

I’ve been working my way through the Dirty Harry films lately and was reminded how much of a badass Clint Eastwood used to be. Long before he was directing films about girls that punched other girls Clint Eastwood was blasting motherfuckers on the silver screen. Not a couple of ne’er-do-wells, mind you, but a battalions-worth of sweaty outlaws.

Of course sheepskin vests are tough. You don’t know you’re talking about.

Clint took the Western crown from the bloated head of John Wayne and made it cool. Yes, he didn’t say much on screen but he didn’t need to. His sharp-tongued Harder/Spencer rifle did the talking for him from a 1000 yards away.

And over the chatter of Clint’s peacemaker boomed the sonorous roar of God with Hugo Montenegro conducting.

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Click here to download the soul of a gunslinger at 320 kbps.

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Tracklist

A1 The Good, The Bad And The Ugly 2:43
A2 March With Hope 2:25
A3 The Story Of A Soldier 2:59
A4 The Ecstacy Of Gold (From The Film “The Good, The Bad And The Ugly”) 2:33
A5 Theme From “A Fistful Of Dollars” 2:04
B1 For A Few Dollars More 2:39
Co-producer – Al Schmitt
B2 Aces High 3:10
B3 The Vice Of Killing 2:15
B4 Sixty Seconds To What? (From The Film “For A Few Dollars More”) 2:18
B5 Square Dance (From “A Fistful Of Dollars”) 2:06
B6 Titoli (From “A Fistful Of Dollars”)

How many times have heard someone say,”Man, I would give anything to have been at so and so’s show show show.” Whether it’s some affluent hippy acquaintance willing to trade her Saab convertible for a few hours of muddy sex at Woodstock, your stoner buddy who would give his left nut to see Led Zeppelin in ’73 at Madison Square Gardens, or that one redheaded raver who’d gladly administer a beej to see Danny Tenaglia in Ibiza during the ecstasy revolution. Everyone has that one show they’d kill to have seen.

Well, this is one of those shows. Mr. Cash, The Man In Black, rable-rousing for a crowd of petty thieves, con men and murderers. What would it have been worth to peep this show? Would it have been worth a day behind bars in Folsom Prison? A month? A year? A spot on death row only to be pardoned by the Governor at the very last second? Well, take a read of Johnny Boy’s words here and have a good old think over it.

Folsom Prison Blues

The culture of a thousand years is shattered with the clanging of the cell door behind you.  Life outside, behind you immediately becomes unreal.  You begin not care that it exists.  All you have with you in the cell is your bare animal instincts.

I speak partly from experience.  I have been behind bars a few times.  Sometimes of my own volition sometimes involuntarily.  Each time, I felt the same feeling of kinship with my fellow prisoners

Behind the bars, locked out from “society.”  You’re being re-habilitated, corrected, re-briefed, re-educated on life itself, without you having the opportunity of really reliving it.  You’re the object of a widely planned program combining isolation, punishment taming, briefing, etc., designed to make you sorry for your mistakes, to re-enlighten you on what you should and shouldn’t do outside, so that when you’re released, if you ever are, you can come out clean, to a world that’s supposed to welcome you and forgive you.

Can it work???   “Hell NO.”  you say.  How could this torment possibly do anybody any good…..But them! Why else are you locked in?

You sit on your cold, steel mattressless bunk and watch a cock roach crawl out from under the filthy commode, and you don’t kill it.  You envy the roach as you watch it crawl out under the cell door.

Down the cell block you hear a steel door open, then close. Like every other man that hears it, your first unconscious thought reaction is that it’s someone coming to let you out, but you know it isn’t.

You count the steel bars on the door so many times that you hate yourself for it.  Your big accomplishment for the day is a mathematical deduction.  You are positive of this, and only this:  There are nine vertical, and sixteen horizontal bars on your door.

Down the hall another door opens and closes, then a guard walks by without looking at you, and on out another door.

“The son of a ….”

You’d like to say that you are waiting for something, but nothing ever happens.  There is nothing to look forward to.

You make friends in the prison.  You become one in a “clique,” whose purpose is nothing.  Nobody is richer or poorer than the other.  The only way wealth is measured is by the amount of tobacco a man has, or “Duffy’s Hay” as tobacco is called.

All of you have had the same things snuffed out of your lives.  Every thing it seems that makes a man a man.  Women, money, a family, a job, the open road, the city, the country, ambition, power, success, failure – a million things.

Outside your cellblock is a wall.  Outside that wall is another wa.  It’s twenty feet high, and it’s granite blocks go down another eight feet in the ground.  You know you’re here to stay, and for some reason you’d like to stay a live.- and not rot.

So, for the fourth time I have done so in California, I brought my sh to Folsom.  Prisoners are the greatest audience that an entertainer can perform for.  We bring them a ray of sunshine in their dungeon and they’re not ashamed to respond, and show their appreciation.- And after six years of talking and finally found the man who would listen at Columbia Records.  Bob Johnston believed me when i told him that a prison would be the place to record an album live.

Here’s the proof.  Listen closely to this album and you hear in the background the clanging of the doors, the shrill of the whistle, the shout of the men…even laughter from men who had forgotten how to laugh.

But mostly you’ll feel the electricity, and hear the single pulsation of two thousand heart beats in men who have their hearts torn out, as well as their minds, their nervous systems, and their souls.

Hear the sounds of the men, the convicts all brothers of mine with the Folsom Prison Blues.

– Johnny Cash

>>>Click here to download Mr. Cash at Folsom Prison in 320 kbps MP3

Tracklist

A1 Folsom Prison Blues
A2 Dark As The Dungeon
Written-By – M. Travis*
A3 I Still Miss Someone
Written By – -J. Cash – R. Cash, Jr.-
Written-By – R. Cash, Jr.*
A4 Cocaine Blues
Written-By – T. J. Arnall*
A5 25 Minutes To Go
Written-By – S. Silverstein*
A6 Orange Blossom Special
Written-By – E. T. Rouse*
A7 The Long Black Veil
Written By – -M. Wilkin D. Danny-
Written-By – D. Danny* , M. Wilkin*
B1 Send A Picture Of Mother
B2 The Wall
Written-By – H. Howard*
B3 Dirty Old Egg-Sucking Dog
Written-By – J. H. Clement*
B4 Flushed From The Bathroom Of Your Heart
Written-By – J. Clement*
B5 Jackson
Vocals [With] – June Carter
Written By – -G. Rodgers – B. Wheeler-
Written-By – B. Wheeler* , G. Rodgers*
B6 Give My Love To Rose
Vocals [With] – June Carter
B7 I Got Stripes
Written By – -C. Williams – J. Cash-
Written-By – C. Williams*
B8 Green, Green Grass Of Home
Written-By – C. Putnam*
B9 Greystone Chapel
Written-By – G. Shirley*

There’s a 1993 Deep Jewel Green Pearl Metallic Mercury Grand Marquis that parks on my quiet Covington, KY street. On the back of that Grand Marquis there’s a bumper sticker. It isn’t very big; only about 2/3 the size of your normal tail treatment. In red font on a black background it says “REINSTATE HANK” on the top and “THE OPRY HAS SINNED” on the bottom.

That Grand Marquis is my spirit animal.

>>>Click here to download the cornerstone of Country & Western.

Tracklist

 

A1 Your Cheatin’ Heart 2:38
A2 Jambalaya 2:47
A3 Lovesick Blues 2:42
Written-By – Cliff Friend , Irving Mills
A4 Half As Much 2:39
Written-By – Curley Williams
A5 Cold, Cold Heart 2:42
A6 Hey, Good Lookin’ 2:35
B1 Why Don’t You Love Me 2:23
B2 Wedding Bells 2:52
Written-By – Claude Boone
B3 Kaw-Liga 2:33
Written-By – Fred Rose
B4 So Lonesome I Could Cry 2:43
B5 Ramblin’ Man 3:00
B6 Honky Tonkin’ 2:40

Click here to activate the Rebuilt Tranny random post generator

You can never have enough vintage racing sound effects in your arsenal. The tail end of the record jacket’s description gives a good tip on how to best listen to this album:

If you keep in mind the programmatic descriptions of the sequences in this recording, it will give considerably more insight into just what is happening on the racing course or near the pits. You will always be able to tell when the cars are on the straight parts of the race course. It is easy to detect the difference between the practice runs and the actual sound of a race. There are other typical sounds of the raceway, each of which has its own individual stamp. These include pumping the gas pedal, ”whining out,” the sounds of tire squeals as the cars round the turns, the sounds of “shifting down” into another gear, the sounds of the tune-up, “backing off,” cars revving up, etc. Use of guaranteed total frequency range techniques plus special microphone placement and expert mastering of records combine to make this an exciting auditory experience.

So, folks, hold on to your seat as the “eight-bangers” roll into action, as the cheater clicks burn up, as the racing drivers come “out of the hole,” as the drivers make the most of their “goodies” and go burning down the track. The starter is flagging the drivers at Daytona.

Click to download Daytona Speedway Sports Cars

The following videos aren’t of the cars featured in this album but they’re running on the same track from the very same year. Each video follows a team of four specially prepped Mercury Comet Cyclones as they drive continuously around the Daytona Speedway ring for almost 2 months and cover 100,000 miles.  Are we there yet?

*Download Below: The original faulty ZIP has been replaced with a new one*

This album consists of songs that weren’t actually in the movie but rather “inspired” by it. I have a feeling that these tracks were considered for the original score but Kubrick didn’t have quite enough room. It’s a shame because the songs in Vol. 2 are quite good. So, you can consider this collection an excellent supplementary B-Side set to the original, if you so desire. I have to admit I prefer Vol. 2 to the original because the songs have a darker, deep space feel. More insane warp tunnel/Spacebaby, less space station/moon base.

Click here to download Vol. 2 to MP3

Tracks with descriptions from album cover:

 1. Richard Strauss – Also Sprach Zarathustra

This selection composted by Richard Strauss is heard at the opening of the motion picture “2001: A Space Odyssey” Karl Böhm conducts the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra.

2. Leo Delibes – Coppélia

(This) was composed by Leo Delibes and conducted by Herbert von Karajan and the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. As in the film. Mr. von Karajan’s performance conveys the feeling of the graceful rocket ships speeding through space.

3. György Ligeti – Lontano

Ligeti’s contribution to the music in “2001:” was very important. This selection, which does not appear in the film, was conducted by Ernest Bour and the Südwestfunk Orchestra.

4. Anton Webern – Entflieht Auf Leichten Kähnen

Written by one of the innovators of modern music with words by Stefan George. It is performed by Clytus Gottwald and the Stuttgart Schola Cantorum, who performances also appeared in the motion picture.

5. Richard Strauss – Waltzes From Der Rosenkavalier

Karl Böhm conducts the Berlin Philharmonic. Again, spacious music for outer space.

6. Richard Strauss – Thus Sprach Zarathustra (Part 2)

Additional exciting music from Richard Strauss symphonic poem from the original recording by Karl Böhm and the Berlin Philharmonic.

7. György Ligeti – Volumina

Performed by organist Karl-Erik Welin. This impressive Ligeti music give the feeling of rushing through space.

8. Aram Khachaturian – Berceuse

From Khachaturian’s “Gayne Ballet Suite.” This was conducted by Gennadi Rozhdestvensky and the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra. Both the conductor and the composer were well represented in the motion picture.

9. György Ligeti – Requiem

This is another part of Ligeti’s Requiem,” a portion of which appeared in the original film. This, however, is performed by the Hessian Symphony Orchestra conducted by Michael Gielen.

10. Charles Gounod – Margarethe

Charles Gounod’s music by the Radio-Symphony orchestra of Berlin and conducted by Ferenc Fricsay, also gives impressions of graceful objects speeding through space to the accompaniment of graceful music.

Click here for a random Rebuilt Tranny post…if you dare!

*download below*

When I was a little kid my parents loved scaring the crap out of me during Halloween. The act would evoke the most devilish, unquenchable laughter together as man and wife. It was as if a monstrous, invisible feather furiously caressed their funny bones in unison. All while I was huddled in a corner crying like a little bitch, frozen in mortal terror.

One particular Halloween branded this album into my psyche. I think I was probably five because my brother was just old enough to carry his fro-topped bobblehead upright around the house. Anyway, we were playing with Hot Wheels in our primary color-slathered bedroom, atop a bitchin’ Pac-Man rug, when suddenly bone-numbing shrieks wafted down the hallway. We opened our bedroom door to find the house completely dark and empty…except for a sea of terrible wailing. We worked our way out through the darkness into the split-level entryway and I cried out, “MOM, DAD…WHERE ARE YOU?!?”  I stood locked in fear.

Terrible thoughts ran through my mind:  They’d been kidnapped. I was all alone. Who would make my pancakes in the morning?

“BOO!!!!!!”

My parents snuck up on me and boxed my ears with the classic Halloween battle cry. I contemplated shitting my pants but instead started bawling–boy did I ever cry. And my parents just laaaughed and laaaughed with a knee slaps interjected for comedic effect.

Why would they do that? To the both of us? Well, my brother probably doesn’t remember, I’m pretty sure he was on autopilot until the age of 12, but I sure as hell do. It was Chilling, Thrilling Sounds Of The Haunted House that really chiseled it into my memory. Maybe my parents didn’t read the disclaimer on the back of the record sleeve….

The Disneyland catalogue of children’s records is one of the finest in the world. The primary audience for Children’s records is the age group from three to eight years. Most of the records in the Disneyland catalogue are made specifically for that group although there are some whose appeal reaches into the early teens. This particular Disneyland record, CHILLING, THRILLING, SOUNDS OF THE HAUNTED HOUSE is not intended for young, impressionable children from three to eight. It is intended for older children, teenagers and adults.

Those bold and capitalized sections in that excerpt were printed just so on the album sleeve. Those words jump right out at you, basically gouge your eyes. So, they probably knew exactly what they were doing when they dropped the needle on this devilish disc. They knew I’d carry this baggage well into my twenties. They knew.

What a couple of assholes.

Just kidding, I love you mom!

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD CHILLING THRILLING SOUNDS ON MP3

Tracklist

Side 1

1. The Haunted House

2. The Very Long Fuse

3. The Dogs

4. Timber

5. Your Pet Cat

6. Shipwreck

7. The Unsafe Bridge

8. Chinese Water Torture

9. The Birds

10. The Martian Monsters

Side 2

1. Screams and Groans

2. Thunder and Lightning and Rain

3. Cat Fight

4. Dogs

5. A Collection of Creaks

6. Fuses and Explosions

7. A Collection of Crashes

8. Birds

9. Drips and Splashes

10. Things in Space

*download below*

This is for everyone that’s been watching Ken Burns’ ongoing 12-hour documentary “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea” this week on PBS.   Included in this MP3 are the following excerpts from a 1967 Pops Festival performance by Arthur Fiedler & The Boston Pops:

-Painted Desert

-On The Trail

Alfred Kfrips, Violin Solo

Leo Litwin, Celsta Solo

Sunset

-Cloudburst

The record was converted into 320 kbps MP3 and has a run time of 25:59.

Download Grand Canyon Suite here!