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Monthly Archives: July 2020

People love the sound of music being played on a vinyl record.  There are so many audiophiles who love collecting vinyl records and even spend a ton of money for that.  But do you know how vinyl records got their start?

Back to 1857 when Edouard-Leon Scott, a French inventor, invented the Phonautograph, which was a device with a vibrating pen would graphically representing sounds onto small paper discs. The Phonautograph was used to help people get a better understanding of how sounds work. Later in 1878, Thomas Edison took this device and created a way to hear the music actually. The device used a stylus to cut grooves into tinfoil in order to record and replay the sounds.

In 1867, Emile Berliner, also an inventor, patented the gramophone – the first vinyl record player which had to be operated by hand and could play seven inch rubber discs. In 1901, the Victor Company introduced a record player named the Red Seal, which could play ten inch vinyl records. 

In 1948, Columbia Records released their 33 ⅓ RPM made from PVC or polyvinyl chloride. It recorded the sound in the grooves in the vinyl. When the record spins, the needle runs along the grooves at the same time passing the information to the electromagnetic head. 

In 1982, Sony invented the compact disc, making vinyl records obsolete. The CD could play the music without the pops and scratchiness of the vinyl so they were easier to carry around than the large records.  Most major labels turned to digital downloads instead of producing records. Although this was popular with the mainstream, DJs and music aficionados still prefered the vinyl record sound. 

Due to the collectibility of the vinyl record, many record labels started to bring back vinyl and sales have been incredible. Some people claim the sound is incomparable if you hear music on vinyl. The fact is that they are back and bigger than ever, no matter what your views are on vinyl records.

Step Six: Archive Storage

If you are looking to store your vinyl in an archive for long term storage and stacking where quick access is not a priority then a top down box (as opposed to a side storing shelf) is the answer. Cardboard boxes are not strong enough. Heavy duty plastic is the answer. The Really Useful Box range is ideal. This illustrated 19 liter model stores around 50 records, making easy transport possible. Vinyl can become too heavy for safe lifting beyond that. The handles are strong with a pattern on the lid that allows for sturdy and stable stacking with other boxes of this type.

Step Seven: Mobile Vinyl Box

Storage doesn’t have to be for static purposes. You can store records for mobile reasons. What happens if you want to transport vinyl? How do you protect them? This Citronic box is just one of many ‘flight cases’ out there. You may have your own favorite. This example is a strong, aluminium variant that holds up to 50 LPs. It arrives with internal padding while, on the outside of the case, there are chrome plated steel corners giving additional strength and protection. You also get a padded carry handle and lockable lid catch.

Step Eight: Vinyl Bag

The record bag is another type of mobile storage but is distinct from the flight case type. This example provides a main compartment which can handle 40 vinyl albums. It’s useful for vinyl fans or DJs who might want to keep their precious or valuable discs close to them at all times or for transporting discs to a friend’s house, for example. More expensive models feature additional pocket and storage options, while their larger wheelie bags for DJs with more time to fill are also a solid choice.