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Tag Archives: electrical recording

The first idea about vinyl discs came about 140 years ago thanks to Edison’s phonograph design, and the first records were also made for the first time in 1948 thanks to Columbia with the first 12-inch coal disc in the world.

It was first introduced to the public on June 20, 1948 at Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New York. And since then many new technologies and mechanisms for listening to music have been born, but removing the vinyl disc from the condom, gently putting it on the turntable and lowering the lever is still possible. Intense shot with most music lovers.

“This is the time for serious music appreciation to create great music performances by the means of record discs. It can be said that the record discs succeeded in accurately and fully reproducing all the details of the symphony or opera performance.

Electrical recording and reproduction have combined to maintain the vitality and color of solo performances. ”- Per Compton Pakenham of The New York Times in 1930.

And the quality only improved in the 1950s with the launch of 33 RPMs, at about 25 minutes each, and the sound strip could be easily edited and optimized for audio in production, then inserted into a master-disc. This master-disc is known as a laquer or acetate disc. In fact, acetate is a misnomer when laquer disks are covered with cellulose nitrate.

And unlike most vinyl discs that are molded, master-discs are cut “manually”, grooves on the surface of the disc are created using a disc cutter needle with mechanical movements controlled by an audio input.

The grooves are checked regularly during the cutting process to ensure the proper depth of the cut path as well as adjust the volume and pitch. After the audio has been copied and the playback quality checked, the laquer will be sent to the production company.