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Tag Archives: history

While the digital world is growing strongly, vinyl LP continues to be collected with stable production levels, perhaps due to their warm, natural analog sound. So, how can LP achieve such unique sound qualities!

In 1877, Thomas Edison was considered the inventor of a phonograph, the first device that could both record and playback sound. This device records the sound bar directly when the dimples on the foil wrap around a grooved roll, which is then played back by rotating the roller, following the movement of the needle along the lines. That groove, vibrates the corresponding mechanical diaphragm and reproduces sound. By the 1880s, Volta invented a wax-coated cardboard cylinder using vibrations of gramophone needles, like a seismograph, called the “hill-and-dale” method, like Edison’s. . Until the beginning of the 20th century, the cylinder was finally replaced by the flat disc recordings that we use today. But even then, the sound is recorded directly on the disk mechanically. Such “acoustical” recordings are based on a large audio device connected to a gramophone needle. When the sound waves that cause vibration will vibrate the needle, and put those vibrations into the hand-cranked disc.

The problem is that the amplitude of the low notes (bass notes) is many times higher than the notes with a higher pitch, the lower-frequency sound occupies more physical distance in each segment, then , high and medium sound bands will be lost during playback. This makes the sound distorted as well as heavy bass. It was not until 1925 that audio inputs were run through a microchip and an amp to increase the range as well as volume without depending on the physical properties of the audio equipment, and the era. The “electrical” records have started. These recordings are deliberately adjusted for high sound bands and low bass, making the sound balanced during playback. 78s – recordable discs with rotational speed of 78 RPM- are seen as a technological leap compared to predecessors.